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    One of Those Fabulous Flights

    Frank Sinatra
    Frank Sinatra

    The wsj.com writes,

    You can go anywhere in the world, the saying goes, and if you can find yourself a nice, classy place where civilized people are gathered, it's a sure bet you will hear a Frank Sinatra song. It doesn't matter what language is spoken. Everybody understands at least a line or two of Lingua Frank, and who knows how many have ditched their Berlitz tapes to instead tackle English to the immaculate phrasing of "Time After Time" or "Young at Heart"?

    Kenny Wheeler: quiet man on the cutting edge

    Kenny Wheeler
    Kenny Wheeler

    The guardian.co.uk writes,

    "Sad songs have always made Kenny Wheeler happy. His pieces often sound like backdrops to movies in which women throwing Mona Lisa smiles over their shoulders vanish into mists, or estranged lovers exchange lingering glances. He isn't given to analysis of why this bittersweet music so fascinates audiences and his fellow jazz musicians – even in a business of few words, Wheeler is legendarily shy – but around his 80th birthday last January he unwound enough to tell me: "What I like doing best is writing sad tunes, and then letting wonderful musicians destroy them. I don't want the players to try to interpret what they think I'm feeling."

    Lightens My Sadness, She Livens My Days

    Pizzarelli & Molaskey
    PIzzarelli & Molaskey

    Concert Review by Stephen Holden (for The New York Times)

    Time warps, time lines and time signatures: as John Pizzarelli crooned Irving Berlin’s “Count Your Blessings” with the tenderness of a father lulling a sleepless child, the voice of his wife and musical partner, Jessica Molaskey, slipped in behind him to sing Jonathan Larson’s “Seasons of Love,” from the musical “Rent.”

    Jazz Saxophonist Marion Brown Dies

    Marion Brown
    Marion Brown

    Known for his association with Archie Shepp, Amiri Baraka, Ornette Coleman and other bright lights of the 60s avant garde jazz community, Marion Brown died on Monday, October 18, in Hollywood, Florida. He was 79. Brown had been ill for many years and had not performed publicly in a long time. Brown recorded over a dozen albums as a leader for Impulse!, ESP, Black Lion and ECM, but is perhaps best known for his appearance as a sideman on two seminal records of the ‘60s: John Coltrane’s Ascension and Archie Shepp’s Fire Music.

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